Category Archives: colour work

using different colour combinations to add visual interest

Barbara’s Plaid is broken

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I did the Fisherman’s Rib (pg 44) for a different hat, but changed my mind.  It kicked around on the needles for a week or so until I decided to do this.  The main stitch is Broken Plaid Pattern, pg 62.  The rib had 112 stitches in it and it is REALLY loose, but 112 (8 x 14) worked beautifully for the decreasing at the top.  If I were to do it again, the ribbing would have 100 stitches and then I would increase in the first pattern row to 112.

I am back on the i-cord roses from the second post on this blog with a vengeance.  Click on the link for instructions.

Barbara is joining Jimi in a Purple Haze

Something she may not have had time for in the sixties.  I sometimes try to think of how she managed to accomplish amassing the collection of pattern stitches.  It must have been hugely hard work and discipline.  In the sixties and especially the seventies, there were two very distinct types of craft books.  One type, like Barbara Walker and others like her, actually advanced craftsmanship.  The other type was done by and for the hippies and contained a very low level of instruction or workmanship.  I had a bookshelf full of both but have only retained the first kind.  Anyway….the latest entries in the Barbara Walker Project:

This hat uses sitches Striped Check Pattern, pg 59

This one uses Four Color Fancy Pattern, pg 59

This hat uses Slip Stitch Ribbing, page 44 and Long Slip Textured Pattern, page 93.  For this one, I added bands to break up the pattern and also see what happens when you use two colours.  For this pattern stitch, you do a base row, then slip every other stitch in that base row three times.  You then do another base row and slip the stitches you didn’t slip before.  For the light purple, I used the same colour for all eight rows.  In the bands I used one colour for the base row and a different one for the slip rows.  I used white for the base row in the lower band with three row of dark purple.  In the upper band I reversed things and did dark purple for the base row and white for the three slip rows.

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The colour in this photo is off, but I am using the same dark and light purple as the other hats.  It uses Triangle Check, pg 60 for the cuff and Harris Tweed Pattern, pg 22 for the body of the mitts.

Barbara is having a watered down Christmas in July…

Heather does not like this post’s colours…to her they look like watered down Christmas, hence the name of the post.  I was going to do these mittens with the cuff as is and the main part in the green. I made the mistake of asking her opinion in the car and got her honest answer, so I followed her advice and stayed with two colours.  To do otherwise in front of her would have seemed rude.  The stitches are Windowpane Stripes, pg 58 for the cuff and Little Check, pg 21 for the main part of the mitts.  (The beige is not reading correctly in this photo…see the last two hats below for the actual colours)

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… I am not all over the colours either, they are just making the best of a bad job these days, but  I almost always actually prefer doing three colours together.  I usually  find it more visually interesting.   I often have a problem when I try to put in a fourth.  Inevitably the fourth will throw off the balance of the first three, or wash out one of them, or make them seem muddy,..the problems quickly mount insurmountably…gillianknits.com
The first hat I did was with a ball of brown that I now have a couple of meters left of (and no longer seems to exist), so I went with a beige for the other two hats. I cast on 100 stitches on 4 1/2mm needles using Patons Classic Wool worsted.  I started with the wine colour and did 12 rows of  Twisted Check, pg 20, then joined back into the cast on edge.  I switched to brown and green and used Honeycomb Tweed, pg. 57 for two inches, then switched back to wine and the first stitch for 4 rows.  The main body of the hat is done in brown using Block Stitch or Dice Pattern, pg 19-20 using the seed block stitch, the garter block stitch, the knit/purl block stitch for one repeat each then using Garter and Rib Check, pg 21 before I switched back to  garter block stitch for the decreasing.gillianknits.com

This next hat uses Zig Zag Knotted Rib, pg 43 and Van Dyke Check Pattern, pg 222.  I cast on 97 stitches with straight needles to do the ribbing (4 1/2 mm needles and Patons Classic wool, worsted).  I used the straight needles because I wasn’t sure I could recreate the stitch correctly on a round needle.  I switched onto a round needle and decreased one stitch at the beginning/end of the round before starting the main part of the hat.  I. tried to decrease in pattern but the top was not great, so I put the i-cord rose on the top in the wine and green colours.gillianknits.com

This is the last hat I am doing in this colourway, at least for now.  It is a bit of a sampler again.  I cast on 100 stitches with same needle and wool as before and did 6 rows of garter stitch before changing to Tricolor Stripe Pattern – woven version first for one repeat, then two rows of garter stitch and one repeat of the stranded version.  After another two rows of garter stitch I did one repeat of Three Color Tweed, pg 61, then two rows of garter stitch and 12 rows of Semi Woven Tweed, pg 60.  gillianknits.com

I did the top in just garter stitch, changing the colour after each row.  I used 10 points of decrease and decreased with a purl two together at each on the purl rows (p8, p2tog, etc…).     After the row that gave me 10 stitches left, I did the knit row, then did p2tog around and finished off.  I actually quite like the effect, if I do say so myself.

 

 

Barbara Walker… week 8

Jah Rastafari

Jah Rastafari

Heather was home last week between classes and exams.  She mentioned that she will be going to a scout moot next weekend with the theme “Reggae vs DIsco”.  I immediately thought “do I have a stitch for you!”.  I knew this, Tricolor Wave Stripes, was the next stitch in Chapter Four, Color-Change Patterns.  It may have been good  to do another slouch, but it is difficult to get slouchy with such a dense stitch.

My next hat went from COLOUR! back to white, It uses Basketweave from Chapter Two, simple Knit-Purl Combinations and Braided Rib from Chapter Three, Ribbings.

Braided Rib and Basketweave

Braided Rib and Basketweave

I tried my best to stay in the pattern as I decreases at the top, but it was difficult to maintain the integrity of the stitch whilst decreasing the number of stitches per pattern repeat.  I don’t mind the top, but I think the basketweave got lost.

disappearing the basketweave

disappearing the basketweave

My last hat of the week uses Reverse Cross-Stitch Ribbing in combination with Mock Cable Rib (as suggested in the book).  I also broke into Chapter Nine, Eyelet Patterns with Zigzag Eyelet Pattern below the Simple Eyelet Pattern.

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I played a bit with the top from last week.  Disappearing 14 stitches toward each other in four sections.  This time when I got to the top of this part, I continued up with slip 1, knit 2 together, psso to the top.  Not actually that much different than the top last week’s hat.

disappearing eyelets

disappearing eyelets

I didn’t get too far this week because my knitting guild challenge is due tonight and I had to finish up my entries on the weekend. My entries are very much also-rans this year, but someone has to lose, right?

 

 

Barbara Walker….week 7

Black and white sampler-side view

Black and white sampler-side view

For these first two hats, I cast on 108 stitches using Patons Classic (worsted weight) wool and 4 1/2 mm needles.  I like 108 stitches if I am doing something that pulls in a bit, like cables or colour work.  108 has a lot of ways to be divisible 3 x 36, 4 x 27, 6 x 18, 9 x 12. For more ordinary tension stitches, I usually cast on about 100 stitches, which covers stitch repeats of 4 or 5 nicely. or 98 or 105 for a stitch repeat of 7, 102 for stitch repeats of 6..  These first two hats used 9 different stitches, all from Chapter 4, Color-Change Patterns.  For the first hat I started at the bottom with Pin Stripe Pattern.  I did a total of 14 rows of each colour, then joined back in to the cast on edge.  I continued up the hat with Three-and-One Tweed, Corn on the Cob Stitch, Pin Check, Pin Check Variation, and finished with Waffle Check. I separated each section with a knit row, then a purl row of black.  I like how the hat fits and it is really cozy and warm…not that we need THAT any more this year, YEAH!!.  Here is the top of that first one:

Black and White sampler-top view

Black and White sampler-top view

I liked how the pinstripe looked, but I felt the band could be less puffy.   I experimented on the second hat and did 7 rows of knit 1, purl 1 ribbing before doing 8 rounds of each colour in the pinstripe pattern and joining back to the cast on edge.

Another black and white sampler

Another black and white sampler

I continued up this hat with Maltese Cross Stitch, Waffle Check Variation, and finished with Dotted Ladder Pattern.  I did a two stage decrease at the top, and I liked the effect (for each quarter of the hat, I decreased on 2/3 of the stitches with the decreases heading toward each other, then when these stitches were gone, did the same thing on the remaining stitches).

Another black and white sampler...top view

Another black and white sampler…top view

I was pleased with how that looked, so decided to do the same basic thing on my next hat, this time doing half the stitches first, then the rest, but without the visual distraction of the colours.

Quaker ridging slouch hat-back view

Quaker ridging slouch hat-back view

I like how this top looks, but unfortunately maybe not on the hat I did.  I used Little Hourglass Ribbing from Chapter 3, Ribbings for 14 rows, then switched to Quaker Ridging from Chapter 2, Simple Knit-Purl Combinations.  As I was knitting this hat, it struck me that it was a pretty flexible stitch and the purl sections might roll up like my socks from a couple of weeks ago, so I thought it might work well as a slouch hat, which I did.

Quaker Ridging slouch hat-side view

Quaker Ridging slouch hat-side view

Heather and my friend Jen both liked the slouch thing, so I decided to do another using Cross-Stitch ribbing and Banded Insertion Pattern.

Banded Insertion Pattern-side view

Banded Insertion Pattern-side view

J decided for this one to just let the stitch itself tell me how to reduce it, even though I still have some ideas related to the last cast off.  I will save them for the future.  I have made notes so I don’t forget.  I quite like how the back turned out.

Banded Insertion Pattern-back view

Banded Insertion Pattern-back view

 

 

 

Barbara Walker…week 6

silly little hat

silly little hat

I kept looking at the beginning of Chapter Four, Colour Work, which starts with this pattern, Simple Vertical Stripes, and thinking “ugh!” This pattern reminds me of Phentex slippers and old ladies’ tea cozies. I decided that I had to bite it and get going because I actually love colour work and am looking forward to later things in this chapter. My compromise is to make a little hat which I can stick in the drawer of the doll’s dresser. It needs to be populated anyway. I used 1 mm (US 00000) needles and some knitting-in wool from spools I bought at one of my local wool stores.  Yarn Forward.

 

Little spools of wool

Little spools of wool

So now I am passed that little hurdle, I have made a couple of regular hats with some of the colour change patterns after that one.

 Two-Stitch Check/Four-Stitch Check Hat

Two-Stitch Check/Four-Stitch Check Hat

This hat uses the next two patterns in the chapter.  I redid the top four times before I left it.  I tried to disappear the stitches staying in the two-stitch check pattern several times before giving up and putting this top on it instead.  I used 9 points of decrease, decreasing on the white (knit) rows, alternating with plain rounds of black (purl).  I did another hat this way a month or so ago before I fired the blog back up.

Top view of Two-Stitch Check/Four-Stitch Check Hat

Top view of Two-Stitch Check/Four-Stitch Check Hat

I then carried on.  I really was not fussed about this, (Elongated Check) pattern, but it is OK on the hat, I think.  Better done than perfect, as they say.  Whoever THEY are.

Hat using Elongated Check Pattern

Hat using Elongated Check Pattern

This hat also uses the next stitch in Chapter 3, Ribbings- Embossed Moss Stitch Ribbing.  I played with disappearing the stitches in stockinette stitch on the top using 7 points of decrease. I did ssk at the beginning of each decrease section every row for 3 rows, did a row with no decrease, then did three rows where I did a k2tog at the end of each decrease section, followed by another plain row.  I alternated like this till I had nothing left.  I quite like how it looks.

Top of Elongated Check Pattern Hat

Top of Elongated Check Pattern Hat

That’s all she wrote for this week, better luck next time…