Category Archives: historic cooking

My one and only Raspberry Tart (till next year)

I managed to collect just enough raspberries this year for one pie. The bushes gave up their last raspberries on Friday, so I decided I better get baking or I would not be able to interpret the fact that I actually had raspberries for a pie.

Mary Eaton. 1823. The Cook and Housekeepers Complete and Universal Dictionary

This excerpt shows the two basic kinds of raspberry tarts of the time. I decided to go with the second option, a straight up raspberry tart with a lattice crust. I used my standard pie crust recipe. This was my first ever lattice crust and it probably shows. I had not realised before that a lattice crust takes exactly the same amount of crust as a regular top crust, just in a different configuration. I suppose if I had thought about it, I may have twigged. I think I will do smaller bars next time as it looks a bit clunky to me. I put the bake kettle on my favourite spot on the hearth, but as this pie shows, there is a high spot on one side and the filling spilled over on part of the pie. My guests were too polite to notice, I am sure.

My Raspberry Tart

Crust:
3/4 cup lard
2 cups flour
1 egg
enough cold water to make 3/4 cup

Cut lard into flour with two knives until things are not getting smaller. Rub quickly and lightly to the consistency of breadcrumbs. Beat the egg add water to make up to 3/4 cup. Use enough of the egg/water to make a rollable dough (usually about half).

Filling
5 cups raspberries
1/2 cup of sugar

Put in 1/2 of the raspberries into a bottom crust, add sugar, then the rest of the raspberries. Make a lattice top by slitting the top crust, then lay every other slat in place on top of the raspberries. Fold back every other slat and put the cross piece on, fold the slats back in place. Fold up the other slats and put the next piece on, etc.

Advertisements

Rumples…they are the best food

When my son was two, one day we asked him what he would like to eat. “Rumples”, he said, “they are the best food”. We asked what rumples were, all we got was “they have holes, they are the best food”. Eventually we realized he was asking for crumpets. I attempted crumpets this week using the griddle in conjunction with tin muffin rings. There are recipes for crumpets cooked in various ways in many historic cookbooks from our time period (1866) and before. Here is a description from the divine Mrs B. (Isabella Beeton, author of Beeton’s Book of Household Management…the Joy of Cooking of the 1860’s)
I am not sure Jacob would have thought my first attempt at crumpets produced the best food, but there you go. I think my batter may have been too thick, and maybe the muffin rings were too small in diameter and too tall to cook them properly. I think I may ask the blacksmith if he can make me iron ones which are shorter and larger in circumference for another go. Mrs. Beeton does call for iron rings, but we only had these ones, made by our tinsmith, on hand.

Crumpet Recipe

2 1/4 cups flour, sifted
3 tsp dry active yeast
1 1/2 cups warm milk
1 tsp sugar (n.b. not in Beeton…added to help the yeast)
1/3 cup warm water
1 tsp salt

Combine flour, yeast, milk and sugar. Beat for 3-4 minutes to develop the holes in the batter. Let sit covered in a warm place for 20 minutes to an hour until doubled. Stir the salt into the water, then stir both into the batter. Add more warm water if necessary to make a thick batter. Let rest in a warm place again for 20 minutes. Bake in rings on a hot griddle for 5-7 minutes per side.